A Fool with a Tool is Still a Fool: Overcoming The Pitfalls of Introducing Collaboration Tools

Thomas Juli, PhD, PMP shares with us what it takes to successfully introduce collaboration tools in our projects.

thomas_juliThomas Juli, PhD, PMP says that as virtual team work becomes prevalent these days, collaboration within and across project teams becomes more important. While numerous tools promise to improve collaboration, a tool by itself is no guarantee for effective collaboration. In this interview, Thomas shares key factors for a tool to successfully help promote effective collaboration and contrasts these factors with major pitfalls of introducing and using collaboration tools.

In this interview, Thomas helps us  understand why collaboration needs to be planned,  avoid pitfalls of introducing collaboration tools, and outline action steps for a successful introduction of a collaboration tool.

Thomas Juli holds a doctorate in international studies from the University of Miami, USA, and an M.A. in economics from Washington University in St. Louis, USA.

He is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) by the Project Management Institute and a Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) by the Scrum Alliance.

Prior to founding Thomas Juli Empowerment Partners he worked for SAP and two leading management and IT consultancies, Sapient and Cambridge Technology Partners. He is author of the book Leadership Principles for Project Success published in August 2010.

The Interview 

Listen now:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Right click here to download the MP3

  1. Tell us a little bit about yourself/your background?
  2. How did you get interested in the topic of collaboration in projects?
  3. You make the distinction that collaboration is not about the tools, it is about people and human interaction. Why is keeping this distinction in mind critical when introducing collaboration tools to our projects.
  4. What are the critical success factors for effective collaboration?
  5. You help organizations with the process of introducing collaboration tools. What are the pitfalls of introducing collaboration tools to projects?
  6. You provide a roadmap for introducing collaboration tools to project teams. Can you walk us thru the 4 steps you recommend to successfully introducing collaboration tools in our projects?
  7. Can you tell our audience about your book: Leadership Principles for Project Success

More about Thomas Juli

Thomas Juli is an experienced, enthusiastic and results-driven manager. His life’s passion has always been to empower people and organizations. This is reflected in his professional career in management, consulting and training. He provides leading edge program and operational management offering more than 13 years of progressive leadership and management experience in various functions including project and program management, strategy consulting, business analysis, professional training and academic teaching.

He consulted for various companies in the telecommunications, banking, energy, and the public sector. He has spoken at conferences on project management and customer relationship management and has written articles on project leadership and management for professional journals.

Before entering business he was engaged in research in the fields of economics and US foreign policy. He holds a doctorate in international studies from the University of Miami, USA, and an M.A. in economics from Washington University in St. Louis, USA.

Contact Information

Websites: www.TheProjectLeadershipPyramid.net and www.thomasjuli.com

More about the book: Leadership Principles for Project Success

thomas_juli_book_coverThis book is about project success. It reveals a secret for project success: effective project leadership.

Filled with samples, templates, and guidelines that readers can immediately use in their projects, this practical guide covers the five principles of effective project leadership and how they can be applied in daily project work. Based on experience in project management and the literature on leadership, project management, business, systems, and complexity theory, the five principles include building vision, nurturing collaboration, promoting performance, cultivating learning, and ensuring results. The book explains these principles in simple, nontechnical language and shows how they can set up, manage, and align projects for success.

The book:

  • Explains the principles encompassing the core of effective leadership and shows how to apply them to everyday projects
  • Discusses setting up, managing, and aligning projects to meet business needs
  • Illustrates how project leadership works through numerous real-world case studies
  • Describes how to rescue projects in trouble and close them successfully
  • Includes many samples, templates, and practical guidelines that readers can immediately use in their projects

Book Excerpt:

Right click here to download an excertp from the book.

Book Reviews:

“I love this book. … takes what could be a tedious and laborious subject and makes it fun and interesting to read … full of anecdotal examples … on my short list of recommended readings and references for an effective leader’s toolbox.”

—Neal Whitten, PMP, Best Selling Project Management Author, Speaker, Consultant, Trainer, and Mentor

“… a great resource for not only projects, but for success in life in general. Start everything of importance with a clear vision and you will end with success.”

—Lee Cockerell, Former Executive V.P., Walt Disney World Resort

“… thoroughly written and compelling … provides the reader with solid leadership concepts that are supported with a clear understanding of how to apply them specifically in the project environment.”

—Michael O’Brochta, PMP, President, Zozer, Inc., Former Senior Project Manager at the CIA, Thought Leader, Author, Lecturer, and Trainer

To read more reviews and find out more about the book, visit: www.TheProjectLeadershipPyramid.net

Listen now:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Right click here to download the MP3

 


 

 

3 Responses to A Fool with a Tool is Still a Fool: Overcoming The Pitfalls of Introducing Collaboration Tools
  1. Shim Marom
    April 14, 2011 | 12:02 pm

    Certainly ‘a fool with a tool is still a fool’, but equally ‘collaboration is an attitude not a tool’.

    • samad_aidane
      April 15, 2011 | 5:12 pm

      Absolutely Shim.

      Well said. If there is not a will to collaborate, a tool will may make the situation clearly abvious but will never in and of itself create collaboration where it does not already exist.

      Thank you for the contribution.

  2. david poole
    September 26, 2011 | 5:38 pm

    Interesting comments. Collaboration is a key. How to get it is always different. I think that the simplest tools should be used in each new project team, and the team then goes on to build the best tools for that team, rather than an elaborate out of the box tool, which is so generic that it creates more work than benefit. The secret is in getting the team mobilised to create their own team collaboration tools, systems and procedures

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://www.guerrillaprojectmanagement.com/overcoming-the-pitfalls-of-introducing-collaboration-tools/trackback

A Fool with a Tool is Still a Fool: Overcoming The Pitfalls of Introducing Collaboration Tools

Thomas Juli, PhD, PMP shares with us what it takes to successfully introduce collaboration tools in our projects.

thomas_juliThomas Juli, PhD, PMP says that as virtual team work becomes prevalent these days, collaboration within and across project teams becomes more important. While numerous tools promise to improve collaboration, a tool by itself is no guarantee for effective collaboration. In this interview, Thomas shares key factors for a tool to successfully help promote effective collaboration and contrasts these factors with major pitfalls of introducing and using collaboration tools.

In this interview, Thomas helps us  understand why collaboration needs to be planned,  avoid pitfalls of introducing collaboration tools, and outline action steps for a successful introduction of a collaboration tool.

Thomas Juli holds a doctorate in international studies from the University of Miami, USA, and an M.A. in economics from Washington University in St. Louis, USA.

He is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) by the Project Management Institute and a Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) by the Scrum Alliance.

Prior to founding Thomas Juli Empowerment Partners he worked for SAP and two leading management and IT consultancies, Sapient and Cambridge Technology Partners. He is author of the book Leadership Principles for Project Success published in August 2010.

The Interview 

Listen now:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Right click here to download the MP3

  1. Tell us a little bit about yourself/your background?
  2. How did you get interested in the topic of collaboration in projects?
  3. You make the distinction that collaboration is not about the tools, it is about people and human interaction. Why is keeping this distinction in mind critical when introducing collaboration tools to our projects.
  4. What are the critical success factors for effective collaboration?
  5. You help organizations with the process of introducing collaboration tools. What are the pitfalls of introducing collaboration tools to projects?
  6. You provide a roadmap for introducing collaboration tools to project teams. Can you walk us thru the 4 steps you recommend to successfully introducing collaboration tools in our projects?
  7. Can you tell our audience about your book: Leadership Principles for Project Success

More about Thomas Juli

Thomas Juli is an experienced, enthusiastic and results-driven manager. His life’s passion has always been to empower people and organizations. This is reflected in his professional career in management, consulting and training. He provides leading edge program and operational management offering more than 13 years of progressive leadership and management experience in various functions including project and program management, strategy consulting, business analysis, professional training and academic teaching.

He consulted for various companies in the telecommunications, banking, energy, and the public sector. He has spoken at conferences on project management and customer relationship management and has written articles on project leadership and management for professional journals.

Before entering business he was engaged in research in the fields of economics and US foreign policy. He holds a doctorate in international studies from the University of Miami, USA, and an M.A. in economics from Washington University in St. Louis, USA.

Contact Information

Websites: www.TheProjectLeadershipPyramid.net and www.thomasjuli.com

More about the book: Leadership Principles for Project Success

thomas_juli_book_coverThis book is about project success. It reveals a secret for project success: effective project leadership.

Filled with samples, templates, and guidelines that readers can immediately use in their projects, this practical guide covers the five principles of effective project leadership and how they can be applied in daily project work. Based on experience in project management and the literature on leadership, project management, business, systems, and complexity theory, the five principles include building vision, nurturing collaboration, promoting performance, cultivating learning, and ensuring results. The book explains these principles in simple, nontechnical language and shows how they can set up, manage, and align projects for success.

The book:

  • Explains the principles encompassing the core of effective leadership and shows how to apply them to everyday projects
  • Discusses setting up, managing, and aligning projects to meet business needs
  • Illustrates how project leadership works through numerous real-world case studies
  • Describes how to rescue projects in trouble and close them successfully
  • Includes many samples, templates, and practical guidelines that readers can immediately use in their projects

Book Excerpt:

Right click here to download an excertp from the book.

Book Reviews:

“I love this book. … takes what could be a tedious and laborious subject and makes it fun and interesting to read … full of anecdotal examples … on my short list of recommended readings and references for an effective leader’s toolbox.”

—Neal Whitten, PMP, Best Selling Project Management Author, Speaker, Consultant, Trainer, and Mentor

“… a great resource for not only projects, but for success in life in general. Start everything of importance with a clear vision and you will end with success.”

—Lee Cockerell, Former Executive V.P., Walt Disney World Resort

“… thoroughly written and compelling … provides the reader with solid leadership concepts that are supported with a clear understanding of how to apply them specifically in the project environment.”

—Michael O’Brochta, PMP, President, Zozer, Inc., Former Senior Project Manager at the CIA, Thought Leader, Author, Lecturer, and Trainer

To read more reviews and find out more about the book, visit: www.TheProjectLeadershipPyramid.net

Listen now:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Right click here to download the MP3

 


 

 

3 Responses to A Fool with a Tool is Still a Fool: Overcoming The Pitfalls of Introducing Collaboration Tools
  1. Shim Marom
    April 14, 2011 | 12:02 pm

    Certainly ‘a fool with a tool is still a fool’, but equally ‘collaboration is an attitude not a tool’.

    • samad_aidane
      April 15, 2011 | 5:12 pm

      Absolutely Shim.

      Well said. If there is not a will to collaborate, a tool will may make the situation clearly abvious but will never in and of itself create collaboration where it does not already exist.

      Thank you for the contribution.

  2. david poole
    September 26, 2011 | 5:38 pm

    Interesting comments. Collaboration is a key. How to get it is always different. I think that the simplest tools should be used in each new project team, and the team then goes on to build the best tools for that team, rather than an elaborate out of the box tool, which is so generic that it creates more work than benefit. The secret is in getting the team mobilised to create their own team collaboration tools, systems and procedures

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://www.guerrillaprojectmanagement.com/overcoming-the-pitfalls-of-introducing-collaboration-tools/trackback

A Fool with a Tool is Still a Fool: Overcoming The Pitfalls of Introducing Collaboration Tools

Thomas Juli, PhD, PMP shares with us what it takes to successfully introduce collaboration tools in our projects.

thomas_juliThomas Juli, PhD, PMP says that as virtual team work becomes prevalent these days, collaboration within and across project teams becomes more important. While numerous tools promise to improve collaboration, a tool by itself is no guarantee for effective collaboration. In this interview, Thomas shares key factors for a tool to successfully help promote effective collaboration and contrasts these factors with major pitfalls of introducing and using collaboration tools.

In this interview, Thomas helps us  understand why collaboration needs to be planned,  avoid pitfalls of introducing collaboration tools, and outline action steps for a successful introduction of a collaboration tool.

Thomas Juli holds a doctorate in international studies from the University of Miami, USA, and an M.A. in economics from Washington University in St. Louis, USA.

He is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) by the Project Management Institute and a Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) by the Scrum Alliance.

Prior to founding Thomas Juli Empowerment Partners he worked for SAP and two leading management and IT consultancies, Sapient and Cambridge Technology Partners. He is author of the book Leadership Principles for Project Success published in August 2010.

The Interview 

Listen now:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Right click here to download the MP3

  1. Tell us a little bit about yourself/your background?
  2. How did you get interested in the topic of collaboration in projects?
  3. You make the distinction that collaboration is not about the tools, it is about people and human interaction. Why is keeping this distinction in mind critical when introducing collaboration tools to our projects.
  4. What are the critical success factors for effective collaboration?
  5. You help organizations with the process of introducing collaboration tools. What are the pitfalls of introducing collaboration tools to projects?
  6. You provide a roadmap for introducing collaboration tools to project teams. Can you walk us thru the 4 steps you recommend to successfully introducing collaboration tools in our projects?
  7. Can you tell our audience about your book: Leadership Principles for Project Success

More about Thomas Juli

Thomas Juli is an experienced, enthusiastic and results-driven manager. His life’s passion has always been to empower people and organizations. This is reflected in his professional career in management, consulting and training. He provides leading edge program and operational management offering more than 13 years of progressive leadership and management experience in various functions including project and program management, strategy consulting, business analysis, professional training and academic teaching.

He consulted for various companies in the telecommunications, banking, energy, and the public sector. He has spoken at conferences on project management and customer relationship management and has written articles on project leadership and management for professional journals.

Before entering business he was engaged in research in the fields of economics and US foreign policy. He holds a doctorate in international studies from the University of Miami, USA, and an M.A. in economics from Washington University in St. Louis, USA.

Contact Information

Websites: www.TheProjectLeadershipPyramid.net and www.thomasjuli.com

More about the book: Leadership Principles for Project Success

thomas_juli_book_coverThis book is about project success. It reveals a secret for project success: effective project leadership.

Filled with samples, templates, and guidelines that readers can immediately use in their projects, this practical guide covers the five principles of effective project leadership and how they can be applied in daily project work. Based on experience in project management and the literature on leadership, project management, business, systems, and complexity theory, the five principles include building vision, nurturing collaboration, promoting performance, cultivating learning, and ensuring results. The book explains these principles in simple, nontechnical language and shows how they can set up, manage, and align projects for success.

The book:

  • Explains the principles encompassing the core of effective leadership and shows how to apply them to everyday projects
  • Discusses setting up, managing, and aligning projects to meet business needs
  • Illustrates how project leadership works through numerous real-world case studies
  • Describes how to rescue projects in trouble and close them successfully
  • Includes many samples, templates, and practical guidelines that readers can immediately use in their projects

Book Excerpt:

Right click here to download an excertp from the book.

Book Reviews:

“I love this book. … takes what could be a tedious and laborious subject and makes it fun and interesting to read … full of anecdotal examples … on my short list of recommended readings and references for an effective leader’s toolbox.”

—Neal Whitten, PMP, Best Selling Project Management Author, Speaker, Consultant, Trainer, and Mentor

“… a great resource for not only projects, but for success in life in general. Start everything of importance with a clear vision and you will end with success.”

—Lee Cockerell, Former Executive V.P., Walt Disney World Resort

“… thoroughly written and compelling … provides the reader with solid leadership concepts that are supported with a clear understanding of how to apply them specifically in the project environment.”

—Michael O’Brochta, PMP, President, Zozer, Inc., Former Senior Project Manager at the CIA, Thought Leader, Author, Lecturer, and Trainer

To read more reviews and find out more about the book, visit: www.TheProjectLeadershipPyramid.net

Listen now:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Right click here to download the MP3

 


 

 

3 Responses to A Fool with a Tool is Still a Fool: Overcoming The Pitfalls of Introducing Collaboration Tools
  1. Shim Marom
    April 14, 2011 | 12:02 pm

    Certainly ‘a fool with a tool is still a fool’, but equally ‘collaboration is an attitude not a tool’.

    • samad_aidane
      April 15, 2011 | 5:12 pm

      Absolutely Shim.

      Well said. If there is not a will to collaborate, a tool will may make the situation clearly abvious but will never in and of itself create collaboration where it does not already exist.

      Thank you for the contribution.

  2. david poole
    September 26, 2011 | 5:38 pm

    Interesting comments. Collaboration is a key. How to get it is always different. I think that the simplest tools should be used in each new project team, and the team then goes on to build the best tools for that team, rather than an elaborate out of the box tool, which is so generic that it creates more work than benefit. The secret is in getting the team mobilised to create their own team collaboration tools, systems and procedures

Leave a Reply

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Trackback URL http://www.guerrillaprojectmanagement.com/overcoming-the-pitfalls-of-introducing-collaboration-tools/trackback